Women in Statewide Elective Executive Office 2017

In 2017, 74 women hold statewide elective executive offices across the country; women hold 23.7% of the 312 available positions.* Among these women, 31 are Democrats, 42 are Republicans and 1 is non-partisan. Women have been elected statewide to executive offices in 49 of the nation's 50 states. In Maine, the governor is the only executive elected statewide, and no woman has ever served as governor there.
*These figures do not include: officials in appointive state cabinet-level positions; officials elected to executive posts by the legislature; officials elected as commissioners or board members from districts rather than statewide; members of the judicial branch; or elected members of university Boards of Trustees or Boards of Education.
Governors
6

Six women (2D, 4R) serve as governors in 2017.

2 D
4 R

Kate Brown, an Oregon Democrat, became governor in 2015 after the elected governor resigned. She served as secretary of state from 2009 until her succession to governor. She served in the Oregon House of Representatives and Oregon State Senate, becoming senate majority leader.

Mary Fallin, an Oklahoma Republican, was elected to an open sear to become the state's first woman governor in 2010 and reelected in 2014. She served as U.S. Representative from 2007-2011. She was lieutenant governor from 1995 to 2007 and served in the Oklahoma House of Representatives from 1990 to 1994.

Kay Ivey, an Alabama Republican, was lieutenant governor and became governor when the elected governor resigned. She was elected state treasurer in 2002 and re-elected in 2006; she won office as lieutenant governor in 2010 and was re-elected in 2014.

Susana Martinez, a New Mexico Republican, was elected to an open seat to become the state's first woman governor in 2010 and reelected in 2014. She was elected the Dona Ana County District Attorney, serving from 1996 to 2009. A Latina, she was one of the first two women of color to serve as governors.

Gina Raimondo, a Rhode Island Democrat, won an open seat to become the state's first woman governor in 2014. She served as general treasurer from 2011-2015.

Kim Reynolds, an Iowa Republican, served as lieutenant governor from 2011 until 2017. She became governor when the incumbent was appointed U.S. ambassador to China. Prior to her election as lieutenant governor, she served in the Iowa State Senate and as Clarke County treasurer.

 

History of Women Governors
39

women (22D, 17R) have served as governors in 28 states.

22 D
17 R

In addition, one woman has served as governor in Puerto Rico. Arizona is the first state where a woman succeeded another woman as governor, and the first state to have had four women governors. Of the 39 women governors, 25 were first elected in their own right; 3 replaced their husbands, and 11 became governor by constitutional succession, four of whom subsequently won full terms. The record number of women serving simultaneously, achieved in 2004 and again in 2007, is 9. 

Lieutenant Governor
12
5 D
7 R
CO Donna Lynne D
CT Nancy Wyman* D
DE Bethany Hall-Long D
IL Evelyn Sanguinetti R
IN Suzanne Crouch R
KY Jenean Hampton R
MA Karyn Polito R
MN Tina Smith DFL
NJ Kim Guadagno R
NY Kathy Hochul D
OH Mary Taylor R
WI Rebecca Kleefisch R

  * Elected independent of the governor.

Attorney General
7
4 D
3 R
Secretary of State
12
6 D
6 R
State Treasurer/Chief Financial Officer
8
4 D
4 R
State Auditor
10
6 D
4 R
AR Andrea Lea R
IA Mary Mosiman R
IN Tera Klutz R
MA Suzanne Bump D
MN Rebecca Otto DFL*
MO Nicole Galloway D
MT Monica Lindeen D
NC Beth Wood D
WA Pat McCarthy D
WY Cynthia Cloud R

* The Democratic-Farmer-Labor (DFL) Party is the state's Democratic Party.

State Comptroller/Controller
2
2 D
CA Betty Yee D
IL Susanna Mendoza D

 

Chief State Education Official
8

(note: title varies from state to state)

7 R
1 NP*

Non-partisan

Commissioner of Insurance
1
1 D
Commissioner of Labor
1
1 R
Corporation Commissioner
1
1 R
OK Dana Murphy R

 

Agriculture and Commerce Commissioner
1
1 R
Public Service Commissioner
2
2 R
Public Utilities Commissioner
1
1 R
SD Kristie Fiegen R

 

Railroad Commissioner
1
1 R
Commissioner of Public Lands
1
1 D
WA Hilary Franz D

 

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