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Research


Other Research

This section contains other research conducted at CAWP or by scholars with support from CAWP. Topics include:

Gender and the Political Parties

“Do Gender Stereotypes Transcend Party?”
Kira Sanbonmatsu and Kathleen Dolan
Political Research Quarterly, September 2009
Voters hold stereotypes about candidate gender and candidate party. Yet, little is known about the intersection of gender and party stereotypes. This paper investigates whether gender stereotypes transcend party, considering whether gender stereotypes affect women politicians differently by party and examining the effect of partisan identification on gender stereotypes. Sanbonmatsu and Dolan find that the public perceives gender differences within both political parties. Thus, the presence of the party cue does not preclude a role for candidate gender. However, the authors also find that the implications of gender stereotypes are somewhat different for Democratic and Republican women. Available from Political Research Quarterly.

“Representation by Gender and Parties”
Book chapter by Kira Sanbonmatsu in Political Women and American Democracy, Eds. Christina Wolbrecht, Karen Beckwith, and Lisa Baldez
Cambridge University Press, 2008, 272 pages
This book provides scholarly research by leading experts in the field of women and politics research. Sanbonmatsu's chapter is a review essay of scholarship on gender and political parties. She argues that future research should integrate theories about descriptive representation with theories about party representation. The book is available from Amazon.

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Research Agendas on Women and American Politics

Women and American Politics: New Questions, New Directions
Edited by Susan J. Carroll
Oxford University Press, 2003, 262 pages
This volume presents a research agenda, developed by leading scholars of American politics, suggesting directions that could fruitfully shape the study of women and American politics in the early twenty-first century. It contains useful reviews of existing research about various aspects of women's political participation, but the primary focus is on important research questions that pose a challenge for the next generation of scholars. The contributors to this volume suggest approaches, methods, and topics for future research on the following subjects: political recruitment, campaign strategy, money, political leadership, parties and women's organizations, the gender gap in voting and public opinion, media, women of color, and participation outside of conventional electoral politics. Order from Amazon and a percentage of the profits from the sale go to CAWP.

Women and American Politics: A Research Agenda for the 21st Century
Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1996, 29 pages
While a generation of activist effort and scholarly attention has both improved the status of women in politics and augmented our understanding of women's political behavior, many questions remain unanswered and myriad issues have not been adequately addressed. In April 1994, the Center for American Women and Politics convened a group of 79 scholars, researchers, political practitioners, and activists to help identify existing gaps in our knowledge, discuss the reasons for the gaps, and imagine the kinds of research projects needed to address unanswered questions. Their discussions are summarized in this monograph. It provides a guide for research on women's participation in American politics to lead us into the next century and aims to stimulate more inquiry by highlighting, for both researchers and funders, major research needs in the study of women and American politics.

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The Abortion Issue in Electoral Politics

Elections and the Politics of Reproduction: Implications for 1998
Debra L. Dodson
Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1998, 82 pages
This study focuses largely on two presidential elections: the 1996 race between prochoice President Bill Clinton (D) and Senator Bob Dole (R) and, to a lesser extent, the 1992 presidential race between prolife President George Bush (R) and prochoice Governor Bill Clinton (D). It uses pre-election surveys of national samples of likely voters in 1996 and 1992, interviews with candidate and issue activists involved in the 1996 election, and information gleaned from a variety of other sources to provide some insight into the role that reproductive rights and other cultural issues may play in the 1998 elections.

The 1992 Election and the Politics of Abortion: Lessons from the Past, Implications for the Future
Debra L. Dodson and Kathleen J. Casey
Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1993, 92 pages
This report focuses on the race for President nationally as well as elections in California for President, U.S. Senate, and state assembly. It provides an in-depth look at the effects of the abortion issue on several election contests in order to explain the role it played in the electoral process and to speculate about what electoral politics may hold for abortion policy and cultural politics in the future.

Abortion Politics in State Elections: Comparisons Across States
Debra L. Dodson
Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1991, 94 pages
This report analyzes the role of the abortion issue in four states' gubernatorial elections: the 1989 New Jersey and Virginia races (the first two states to hold election following the Supreme Court's Webster decision) and the 1990 Michigan and Pennsylvania races (two states which passed new abortion restrictions prior to their 1990 elections.) Using survey and interview information from voters, candidates, and activists, the report examines similarities and differences among these states and discusses the lessons that can be learned from these elections. The findings have important implications for future elections.

Election 1989: The Abortion Issue in New Jersey and Virginia
Debra L. Dodson and Lauren D. Burnbauer with Katherine E. Kleeman
Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1990, 183 pages
This report contains findings from a study of the first two states to hold gubernatorial and state legislative elections after the Supreme Court's Webster v. Reproductive Health Services decision. Using survey and interview data from voters, candidates and activists, researchers at the Eagleton Institute of Politics looked at how the abortion issue played a role in the two states' elections.

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Civic Engagement

Gender and Civic Engagement: Secondary Analysis of Survey Data
Krista Jenkins
Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning & Engagement, 2005, 14 pages
A CAWP study explores whether gender is salient in civic engagement. For the most part, author Jenkins determines that “[y]oung women and men appear to be receiving the same cues about politics, elected officials, and the political process.” While young men and women appear to behave in a similar fashion, “young women are distinguishing themselves from young men on some key precursors to engagement, particularly attentiveness and knowledge." Available here.

Voluntary Participation Among Women in the United States: A Selected Bibliography, 1950-1976
Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1976, 35 pages
This bibliography cites materials dealing with the nature and extent of U.S. women's voluntary activities and affiliations.

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Women’s Organizations and Public Life

Righting Feminism: Conservative Women and American Politics
Ronnee Schreiber
2008, Oxford University Press, 192 pages
Schreiber analyzes in detail two prominent conservative women's organizations. To order this book, visit Amazon here and a portion of the proceeds of the sale help support CAWP.

Playing ‘Femball’: Conservative Women’s Organizations and Political Representation in the United States
Book chapter by Ronnee Schreiber in Right-Wing Women: From Conservatives to Extremists Around the World
2002, Routledge, 336 pages
Schreiber tackles the divide in research that explores conservative women’s organizations and how they tailor their message to be consistent with the views of conservative women.  Ronnee Schreiber is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at San Diego State University. To order the book, visit Amazon here and a portion of the proceeds of the sale help support CAWP.

Elected Women Organize: Statewide Associations
Wendy S. Strimling
Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1986, 40 pages
This report examines the status of statewide associations of elected women in twelve states. The associations bring women together across party lines and from all levels of office.

Women's PACs
Katherine E. Kleeman
Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1983, 28 pages
This monograph is based on information gathered at a meeting with representatives of fourteen political action committees which solely or primarily support women candidates. It describes some of the key questions faced by such groups, and illustrates the varied ways in which they have answered these questions.

Leaders of Organizations of Women Public Officials: Report from a Conference
Diane Rothbard Margolis
Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1980, 31 pages
A report from CAWP's 1980 conference in Washington, D.C., attended by seventy-five leaders representing over forty organizations of women in politics and government. This conference was conducted under a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Women's Organizations in the Public Service: Toward Agenda Setting
Diane Rothbard Margolis and Kathy Stanwick
Center for American Women and Politics, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 1980, 114 pages
This report about research conducted under a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development identifies organizations of women public officials across the country and examines their goals and agendas. It describes the founding of these organizations, their structures, their relationships with parent organizations, their reasons for forming, and their programs.

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